WE    DO NOT    ADVOCATE USING E-COLLARS, PRONG COLLARS OR PHYSICAL PUNISHMENT. WE FOLLOW THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE AMERICAN VETERINARY SOCIETY OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR FOR REWARD-BASED TRAINING.

WE DO NOT ADVOCATE USING E-COLLARS, PRONG COLLARS OR PHYSICAL PUNISHMENT. WE FOLLOW THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE AMERICAN VETERINARY SOCIETY OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR FOR REWARD-BASED TRAINING.

For Your Puppy

All of our training or packages start with a 2-Part Initial Consultation: 1. phone consult, 2. in-home assessment.

PRICING: $200 ($50 Phone Consult, $150 in-home assessment)

  • Please note: WE DO HAVE A $25 CANCELLATION FEE THAT IS AUTOMATICALLY CHARGED TO YOUR ACCOUNT IF THERE IS NOT A 24 HOUR NOTIFICATION TO CANCEL PROVIDED.

PRICING: $475 (5 session, Puppy Kindergarten training pass)

  • We start training puppies at 8 weeks old.

  • All training is done in your home.

  • We suggest videos by Dr. Sophia Yin and her book Perfect Puppy in Seven Days and Puppy Start Right: Foundation Training for the Companion Dog, by Dr. Kenneth Martin and Debbie Martin, to supplement what you learn during training.


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The first 4 months of your dog’s life is the best time to build a foundation for training and for learning about the world. Socialization is critical during this time because puppies are primed for bonding to other animals and individuals, for learning that objects, people, and environments are safe, and for learning what the body cues and signals of others mean. Puppies who do not get adequate socialization during this period tend to be fearful of unfamiliar people, or dogs, or sounds, objects and environments.

By signing up for this training pass, you are set to build a foundation for a lifelong companion. Our Puppy Kindergarten training pass is 5 sessions. Each one hour session is focused on the most vital aspects of puppy development – socialization and dog-to-dog interaction.  Our puppy training covers common puppy issues such as:

  • soiling in the house

  • separation anxiety

  • chewing

  • stealing, digging

  • running away

  • guarding of food and toys

  • jumping up

  • fear of new things

  • fear of restraint


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Quick Answers based on Puppy Start Right: Foundation Training for the Companion Dog, by Dr. Kenneth Martin and Debbie Martin :

My puppy goes wild biting me and grabbing onto my pant legs. What do I do? Chapter 5: Problem Solving and Prevention (pages 54-55 in book)

Nipping and play biting are your puppy's attempt to interact with you. Redirect and provide your puppy with appropriate items to chew on. Engage your puppy to play with a toy when he is calm. Interacting with your puppy predictably and consistently creates a foundation for trust that will last a lifetime.

Why does my puppy pee as soon as he comes indoors after being outside? Chapter 6: House Training (pages 93-99 in book)

Complete bladder control in puppies is a gradual process. The key to successful house training is management and supervision. It is essential to go outside with your puppy so you know if his bladder is empty or full upon re-entering the home. Restrict access around the house when your puppy is unsupervised. Overly frequent urinations can indicate a bladder infection and complicate house training. See your veterinarian to rule out urinary tract infections.

My puppy is destroying rugs and furniture legs. How do I stop it? Chapter 5: Problem Solving and Prevention (pages 62-63 in book)

Puppies explore the world with their mouths. It is your job to manage your puppy’s environment by supplying appropriate chew toys and controlling access to inappropriate objects.

I cannot crate my puppy because he barks in the crate. How do I stop it? Chapter 5: Problem Solving and Prevention (pages 66-69 in book)

Most puppies suffer from some initial separation distress when left alone. If your puppy’s barking causes you to give him attention by talking to him or letting him out of the crate, you are actually rewarding the behavior of barking. Often the behavior will go away if it is not rewarded. If the barking is excessive, talk to your instructor, who can guide you to appropriate resources.

My puppy is frightened of the vacuum cleaner. How do I help him? Chapter 4: Socialization (pages 28-32 in book)

When your puppy is frightened of an object or person, it is important to change the meaning of that association to something pleasant. Often this is accomplished gradually by increasing the distance from the “scary” thing, and giving the puppy food treats when he sees it.


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Additional Resources for your puppy:

Books

The Culture Clash by Jean Donaldson   

Don’t Shoot the Dog by Karen Pryor           

Puppy Training for Kids by Sarah Whitehead            

Living with Kids and Dogs…Without Losing Your Mind by Colleen Pelar, CPDT

These books can be found at one or more of the following: clickertraining.com, amazon.com, dogwise.com, Barnes and Noble, or Petsmart.